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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it is not the same religion, but we have much in common. >> but others could not accept the idea of muslims praying in a former christian church. >> i think it would be better if they set up a mosque someplace else in town. if the christians keep giving ground, we will lose our faith and identity. after all, france is a christian country. >> the sale of the church would not have had a happy ending. for the archdiocese responsible for the church got involved and decided instead to sell the church to a charity. the bishop justified the decision by saying the paris- based charity was nondenominational. this even though it is called the fraternity of st. aloysius and is dedicated to the same st. as the church. they are collecting donations to buy the building. their motto "stop the mosque" makes their position clear. >> we are opposed to converting the church into a mosque. christenings, weddings, and funerals were once held there. now that will all be wiped away. the church will be something else entirely. we have gathered thousands of signatures from all over france and from canada and switzerland. s
parents like that. very modern. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but bea
human beings. so they look for the devil and look among the deities, a very complex religion. very elaborate, very well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found be issue, the deity called issue. who's issue? i often refer to issue as the imminent -- [inaudible] of the human condition. why do i call him that? issue is an unpredictable spirit. issue exists to teach humanity, but there's always more than one side to an issue. more than one face to any reality. teaches you beware of appearances. the best laid plans of mice and men, etc., issue is the embodiment of the lesson gained by such things. and when you teach humanity about the folly in -- [inaudible] or being dogmatic about any issue, it tends to do it in a rather painful way, you know, hike a good teacher armed with a cane, symbolic cane for adults who haven't learned the wisdom of looking at both sides of a question. and his places are the crossroads where, of course, which is the place where human beings get confused. which road do you take at a crossroads? issue's so mischievous that in the overall pant
schools. i bought the line. i still buy the line. c-span: have you stayed with your religion all your life? >> guest: yes, i guess i have. i guess i really have -- or it stayed with me. one or the other. c-span: has it been hard? >> guest: sometimes. sometimes, yes. it's a pretty secular business. moving around the world a lot sometimes gets hard, but i think it's also your strength as well as difficult. c-span: people who are angry at the press write a lot that they don't think many members of the press are very religious. do you find that? >> guest: i don't know. you mean whether they practice a religion? c-span: we get calls here where people suggest they're even anti-religious. >> guest: yes, in a way i think for a lot of them, politics becomes their religion or broadcasting becomes their religion. c-span: conservative. >> guest: conservative, yes. i was a charter member, literally, of young americans for freedom back in the early '60s. actually it was the late '50s because i came to new york in '59. read buckley stuff. thought it was great. liked what he said. it seemed to fit in with
. to be fair to all persons. all ethnicities, all sexual orientations, and religions. an african-american, a woman. don't lose sight of the purpose of the conversation today. today jane and i want to make a statement that oftentimes foreshadowed when you don't have the pulpit. today we successfully have demonstrated that even the sidelines, even the corner, you can raise your voice, have another opportunity, another option, viable, strong, that has integrity, is thoughtful, filled with love and compassion. that is what leadership is about. stepping forth outside of your comfort zone and doing things sometimes when people to the left and to the right, no pun intended, are not able to do at that particular moment. so - as we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation, the 50th anniversary of the march in washington, the commemoration of the first time in history san francisco mayor has been led by an asian american, five board of supervisors; we are leaving the country. they are watching and paying attention. every person that can hear my voice, every
obama will unvail his religions for re-- unvail his recommendation for gun violence. recent polls show most americans want stricter gun control laws but republicans will fight against gun control. >> this is a very important constitutional right. we are dedicated to protecting the second amendment from that stand point. >> president obama will announce his proposal to reduce gun violence at the white house this morning. he will be joined by children who wrote to them about gun violence following last month's school shooting in newtown, connecticut. many people participating in a gun buy back program went home empty handed. it ran out of money in a little in about an hour. plus how gun owners were compensated after the cash ran out. >>> time is 4:35. the mountain view stickum has yet to -- city council has yet to make a decision on whether to ban food carts downtown. other members discuss the growing popularity showing the trucks serve a grab and go clientele. a former vote will take place at a later date. >>> tickets for the sharks two on sale at 10:00 this morning. the sharks first ho
religion to highlight that and this is where we incorporate imams, or faith leadrs. >> the talk about how they will reasonably be able to make a distinction between an arranged marriage and a forced marriage. >> a that arranged marriage includes consent. on the other end, you have forced marriages ended is the gray area in between that will be a challenge for prosecutors and law-enforcement agencies to capture. what's the real power lies in the hands of children who need to find the strength to say no to the authority figures in their lives. al-jazeera, london. >> this will take it to afghanistan where gender violence remains a problem despite the 2009 wall. we follow one woman's quest to justice after her daughter was killed by her husband. she said the murder could have been protected -- prevented. bulgarian police have arrested a man who pointed a gun at the head of the turkish party as he was making a speech. the 25-year-old approached him at the conference and held a pistol to his head. the man was quickly disarmed and detained. wintry weather sweeping across the u.k. and an avalanch
where the problem lies. >> changing the mindset for us is about utilizing religion to highlight the at and it is where we incorporate face leaders. >> others question how officers will reasonably be able to make a distinction between arranged marriages and forced once. >> arranged marriage is one based on joyce and consent. at the other end of the continuum, you got forced marriage based on coercion and the rest. it is the gray area in between that will be a challenge for prosecutors and law-enforcement agencies to captor. >> the real power lies in the hands of children who some honey to find the strength to say no to the authority figures in their lives. >> in the third part of our series of women around the world, we will take to the afghan capital word gender violence remains a problem despite a 2009 protection law. we will follow one woman's quest for justice after daughter was killed by her husband. she says the murder could have been prevented if the police had done their job. it has been another day of chaos in europe as heavy snow disrupts transport across the region. 40
or bothered me about my religion. it was hard for me to give up my citizenship and i am sure in tehran is not easy to do. the man behind me in line with a hungarian who hugged me and citizens it great to be an american? i said don't know. i will tell you later. >> we opened the book with a vivid scene from 1968, you had flown to reno to get a divorce in the days before his divorce. very difficult to get a divorce back then. it had be someone's fault and it was not easy. she came back and was in a bit of a state and drove her car directly into the middle of a riot in downtown d.c.. it was the morning after the night martin luther king was assassinated in a city of people here who note exploded. the 1960s and 1968 was a time of major turmoil in the united states and also a huge time of change in your life because you did something that was difficult, you got a divorce after a very long marriage and it was the time when the women's movement was really beginning to get underway in united states but i was impressed that you were not inspired by the women's movement, it was something else. >
that today, to be a follower of the yoruba religion is to earn the death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. christians also earned the death sentence in certain parts of nigeria and christians respond in kind and set upon the muslim community. but the level of intolerance based on ignorance has enriched such -- european papers any time in nigeria find out the church has been burned down, worshipers are machine guns, the mosque has been burned down, bombed out of existence because even within the muslim religion there are different degrees of purity. once i consider the other side not sufficiently pure and therefore deserving censorship, the nigerian situation is more complicated as in other societies. there's never one single issue that needs to this total stabilization of society. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. .. >> thank you, amanda. um, okay. i wrote a little something here, and i can get my glasses on and read it -- oh, and i've also got it, wait a minute, it's in the kindle. so let's see if i can read it in the kindle. but it's this little t
. it has park ad great debate here in the u.k. about the role of religion in public life. now, the european court today in strasbourg, france, ruled that nadia's implyers, british airways, policy interfered with her right to practice her religion. she was quote jubilant and very pleased that quote, christian rights had been vindicated. british airways sent her home without pay in 2006 when she refused to remove her cross or put it under her uniform. she lost her case in a british employment tribunal, it ruled it is not the religious duty of christians to wear a cross. but ba ultimately changed the dress code rules and reinstated eweida. she feels they did it under pressure and not a change of heart. her victory does again sit her for -- compensate her for lost pay is a symbolic one. >> i have colleagues who wear hijab and muslim colleagues that don't wear hijab. they have a choice to wear it or don't wear it. everybody has the right and faith and makeup to express their faith in their way. why should i be discriminated against on par with other colleagues? >> reporter: british prime ministe
member paul hagut says he thinks the religion is a cult. the church dismisses him as the hypocrite of hollywood. we'll speak with him and talk to the author of a new book that explores the link between scientology and hollywood. >>> we want to get to breaking news. nbc's nichelle cokosinkski liven london. >> reporter: this has been changing by the moment. first, the report that a number of hostages has escaped. now that algerians have raided the facility and a number of have been killed, including hostages. 41 people held, among them americans, british, norwegians, and they called this retribution for french intervention in neighboring mali against militant there. at this hour scattered reports out of the algerian desert. that large bp gas facility, that a standoff is going on. algerian army has militants and dozens of international hostages surrounded. among them, americans. >> in order to protect their safety, i'm not going to get into numbers, i'm not going to get into names, not going to get into any further details as we continue to work on this issue with the algerian authori
, paul haggis, says he thinks the religion is a cult. the church says haggis has not been an active member in years and dismisses him as "the hypocrite of hollywood." we will hear from paul haggis and talk to the author of a new book that explores the ties between scientology and hollywood. but we are going to begin with breaking news what could be dramatic developments in that hostage situation involving americans in algeria. nbc's michelle kosinski has the latest for us in london. michelle, good morning to you. >> reporter: hi, savannah. this is changing by the minute. the latest from the associated press, quoting an algerian official, is that at least 20 of these hostages have now been able to escape, including americans. the al qaeda-linked militant group that has claimed responsibility for this say they have been holding 41 hostages, among them, we know americans, british, norwegians, japanese and they claim that this is retaliation for french intervention in neighboring mali against islamic militants there. at this hour, scattered reports out of the algerian desert that this l
: nowhere is that sense of betrayal felt more deeply than in france where cycling verges on a religion and armstrong committed his sins. despite his youthful appearance alexander roous has been covering cycle for years. >> he lied he cheated. doesn't that tear the heart out of france? >> yes, yes, of course. there's just a blank from '99 to 2005, that's a scar that will stay on the history of the tour. >> forever. >> forever. >> reporter: fellow athletes say armstrong has no place among him. >> it's disgrace for the sport to have an athlete like this. he cheated the sport, he cheat phd people around the world. >> reporter: speaking ahead of the interview, current tour de france champions bradley manning says armstrong critics may have finally got their man, but it's time to move on. >> it will be a great day for a lot of people and a quite sad day for the sport in some ways. i think it's been a sad couple of months for the sport. >> reporter: writing off those races is exactly what tour officials here want to do. they're treating his wins as if they didn't exist. o
and their religion, and when he made that statement, i think that was really a wakeup call for a lot of people. >> we have behind you semiautomatic rifles, and there are people who stricter gun regulation in the united states. why do you need a semiautomatic rifle if you're a firearm supporter. how would you react to them? >> semiautomatic rifles, for example, the ar-15, is really part of our culture. anybody that grew up, did military service in the 70s, was trained on an m-16, and it's kind of consistent with what we do with appreciating using similar-type weapons that we were trained on in the military, but this is a civilian legal version of the same thing. >> quickly, supporters of the second amendment believe in their need and right to protect the citizenry against aty rankle government, is that accurate? >> it is. a lot of that is lost in translation where people don't realize that the second amendment, one of the provisions of the second amendment is to protect ourselves from a government that could be a tyrannical government. >> thank you for joining us very much on fox business. now, you se
in much of the liberal wings of the political party towards organized religion. i think it's intolerance of the left twashd people of good faith on the right and that worries me. i wish colin powell had talked about that as well. i wish colin powell had talked about the implications of chunk hagel talking about the jewish lobby that intimidates people. he said, make the jews pay. colin powell could have talked about that and whether that was a dark strain or is his focus only on when republicans act wrong? chuck hagel did, too, in these circumstances. it's a topic worth discussing but needs to be discussed in every direction, not just one. tolerance needs to be taught and practiced by all. >> i think that's -- you know, i've got to say that's the sort of thinking by republicans that, seriously, gets in the way. as opposed to attacking, you know, clearly there's issues with the republican party and minorities in this country. >> it's a one-way street. >> a false equivalence about democrats and evangelicals that makes me scratch my head. taking in what colin powell has to say, look at the
is the state religion practiced by 99% of the population in algeria. it borders two countries in turmoil, libya and mali. as you can see on this map. so al algeria received almost $3 million in american aid in 2012. bill: what about these americans now? what about their fate and what about the future? in a moment hear new warnings the raid in algeria might be just the beginning. national security analyst kt mcfarland that america's light footprint on terror could mean many more deadly attacks like the one we saw at our consulate in libya. she is here next hour along with general jack keane. we'll discuss all of that with two outstanding guests coming up. martha: onto this story now because reaction is pouring in today to lance armstrong's explosive interview with oprah winfrey he finally admitted after years of denials and of blaming others and calling others liars that he did indeed use performance-enhancing drugs throughout his career and they were quote, just part of the job. casey stiegel is live outside livestrong headquarters in, texas this morning. casey, he said some pretty powerful stu
for anything but you might have used on facebook. this could be due to religion, politics and schools. all this information can be easily searched by your friends. deserter bird talk about this a a press conferencezucker burke talked at this at the press conference. what we will do is that we will put us as an encouragement among on- screen so that way everyone will have a chance to look through the tools at to see what people will be able to find about them. >> facebook is trying to and voided a privacy controversy. they're trying to make it easy for users to alter their settings. when you see this privacy's sentencin setting talipot but yu should click on and go through. >> you could go to your face book privacy's settings and adjust your activity log perry e. use a remote any information that you do not want to be searchable. for the time being they have not integrated. you should go through your life wit \. facebook will use your likes and interest to do your results. people will be at a search for people who have lived in kansas or wore a democrat or maybe single. >> >> it is 9:27 a.m
. clearly they must get something out of this religion and of this faith. what do you think they are getting out of scientology? >> let's start with millions of members which the church says that they have. according to census figures, 25,000 people in the u.s. call themselves scientologists. that's half the number of rastafarians. in the entire world there may be 30,000. this figure, millions of scientologists, is another one of those unsupported statements by the church that they're constantly putting out with no evidence about it at all. >> there's been a lot of reaction to your book, as you know. >> yes. >> the church has dismissed it. they have questioned your credibility, calling your sources liars. and both the canadian and the british versions of your book at the last minute are now not being published. the church says the reason is because it's false. and that it's defamatoriy. how do you respond? >> i know the church came here and talked to your executives. and you asked them to be on camera. where are they? did you ask david miskavich to come on and defend the allegations against
but to invent your own religion you're own spirituality. ♪ you got to help me to take a stand ♪ >> if i say "fire and rain," what's the first thought you have? >> i remember where i was when i wrote the tune. >> where were you? >> whether it first occurred to me. i was in a basement flat in london in the west end. ♪ oh i seen fire and i seen rain ♪ >> and the song just came to me. and then -- >> just came to me? >> uh-huh. i mean you know, songs were -- that was happening frequently to me at that point. and -- >> why was that at that point this was happening to you? >> well, i had a lot of empty time. i had a lot of energy. i had a lot of yearning a lot of unsolved senses of -- i very much wanted to express myself and define myself. >> was that the most fertile period for you ever? >> yeah, yeah it was. i was really busting at the seams to express myself. ♪ i'm going to carolina in my mind ♪ >> where did that song come from? >> i was homesick. i was in london and i was -- i was just thinking about north carolina. i was so -- >> does it just flow once you got on to
and regulation of the land and naval forces. >> congress shall make no law remaining an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or of bridging the freedom of speech or of the press. >> steve: virginia congress led the effort and joins us live there washington. good morning to you, congressman. >> good morning. >> steve: it would seem to me that this -- it's only the second time in american history that you guys have done this because it would seem like as you kick off a new session of congress, it's essentially the owner's manual, how the country works. >> it absolutely is and leading up to the 2010 election, there was a lot of debate about how our government, the executive branch, legislative branch, even the courts were not abiding by the u.s. constitution. so i suggested to our leadership that we read the constitution at the beginning of that congress. then i asked my staff to research when is the last time it was done. turns out 1800 and never and that was a stunner for me, too. so we put it in the rules and now at the beginning of each congress we're going to read
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)